A mantra is a word or sound repeated to aid concentration in meditation. A less legalistic and more spiritually inclined person would tell you that they’re repetitive sounds used to penetrate the depths of the unconscious mind and adjust the vibration (...)
This next song is dedicated to the dreamers — the ones reading this right now at their office desk, spacing out to some really deep house jams with minds wandering about their next music festival. The ones who press their face (...)
Gen Z’s are old souls. Maybe it's the by-product of growing up surrounded by every conceivable culture, absorbing all of the greatest art, music, and film from every corner of the Earth and every possible genre. In the '80s and 90s, even the (...)

What Is Chill Indie Music?

The term chill as a musical descriptor came to prominence in the '90s, as information technology was really getting going in earnest. If 'chill music' is a genre, of any kind, it may be the first postmodern musical genre. Which is to say, it doesn't have a hard-and-fast definition, or even a consensus on its musical characteristics. So let's go ahead and dig into its etymology a bit in search of a definition. 

The word 'chill' is the variable that's going to help us solve this equation. Because it's been used to describe legit musical movements, as well, that have some defining aesthetics we can expound upon. 

Chill music is a shortened version of 'chill-out music,' which was an honest-to-goodness musical style in the late '80s and '90s. Chill-out music stemmed from the chillout rooms in raves and dance clubs. London's Heaven Nightclub featured the first high-profile chill-out room, where ambient music like Brian Eno would mix with progressive House, Techno, and Trance, from artists like The Orb, Orbital, or The KLF. These chill-out rooms were meant as a respite from the overwhelming stimulation of the big rooms. Which is also where we get our first hint why this music's so vital. And why it seems to be spreading.

I don't know about you guys but it’s been one heck of a week. Between work, family drama, and having to deal with myself, I for one am glad it’s Friday. For many, Fridays mean weekend mode on, for us at We Are: The Guard, it means it’s that (...)
Hello gals and gents. It’s me! Your favorite Latina homebody here to guide you through what’s hot and buzzing this past week on Instagram. You will laugh. You will snort. You might even… giggle. But I’ve searched (...)
“Only higher we shall go” is the sole lyric on Emmit Fenn’s aptly named “Higher”. It’s sung in such feathery soft falsetto that it takes several close listens (read: looking up the lyrics on Genius) to make out what is even being said. But even if the words (...)
Norwegian singer/songwriter girl in red reflects on the dark side of party life on "Dead Girl In The Pool." Have you ever partied just a little too hard? If you're a fan of rock 'n roll, club music, and sucking the marrow out of life, the (...)
Good things come in pairs, but great things come in five sets of pairs. Quick, five multiplied by two. Yes, ten! Ding, ding, ding. If we dig a bit deeper we come to find out that ten is the number that signifies new beginnings, meaning … it’s the (...)
I never thought four years of Spanish lessons would come in handy until I heard “Uno” by Ambjaay. The rappers bilingual single leaves me asking “Where was this song when I was in high school?” This jam is full of flavor and is packed with (...)
Normally I try to stay away from songs that remind me that deep down inside I’m truly really sad, that’s why I tend to go for songs with pep because they help me forget about my pain, but somehow gnash has managed to pull off an entire song (...)
Feeling down? Alone? You're not alone. Might as well celebrate with Dog Orchestra's "Pity Party.” "Maybe if you stopped feeling so sorry for yourself you'd be more… successful," intones a carbonite voice, ripped straight from an (...)

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